How to Make Viral Videos and What to Make Your First YouTube Video About

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How to Make Viral Videos and What to Make Your First YouTube Video About

So in this video, I'm
gonna be talking about how to make a viral video,
what you should make your first YouTube video about
if you haven't started yet, and some video ideas that don't
require you to be on camera and show your face. Coming up. (Shutter snaps) (autofocus beeps) Hey, what's up, guys? Sean Cannell here with THiNK Media TV. Helping you go further faster in media.

On this channel, we do video
gear reviews, lighting, audio tips, and also Q&A
videos just like this one. So if you're new here, definitely
think about subscribing. Let's get into the questions. (Papers crunch) IanToGo asks, do viral
videos have things in common? Great question, Ian.

Everybody wants to make a viral video. I know I do. And, full disclaimer, I never really have. I think my most viewed
video was an interview with my friend's daughter
that might be over around a million views or something.

(Baby vocalizes) Who do you think is the best YouTuber? (Baby vocalizes) Really? Well, what about your mom and dad? – No, no. – And I'll link that up
in the description below. But honestly, making a viral
video is not necessarily something you can guarantee,
but they do have common traits. So a couple of things,
if you were trying to make a viral video, to think about: Number one, viral videos
are usually short.

You never see viral videos
that are super long. Number two, a lot of times,
they have music and/or dancing. One of the most well-known viral videos was Rebecca Black's Friday  Friday, Friday,  Gettin' down on Friday Gangnam Style, music.  Oppa Gangnam Style  Gangnam Style A lot of viral videos have music in them, and a lot of times they
have dancing as well.

Third, a lot of times they
are connected to trends, and so something happens,
and you get your video out quick enough, based around
pop culture, trends, something that's happening, and then you're able to ride
that wave of popularity. Fourth, and probably most important, is that viral videos provoke emotion. So they might be funny,
they cause you to laugh. They might be shocking.

They might be gross. You're like, ew! But it's so gross that
you really wanna share it. They might just be ridiculous. A lot of time trick shot videos go viral, because they're so amazing.

They provoke emotion. They cause you to want to laugh. They cause you to want to cry. They're very emotional, and
they move you emotionally.

So if you're trying to
create a viral video, make sure you tap into something that will tap deeply into human emotion. Then the last thing is a
lot of times viral videos have either kids in them or
animals in them, or both. And then hey, if you wanna
dive a little bit deeper into viral videos, I'll
link up a couple resources. The first is a TED Talk from Kevin Allocca that talks about the
elements of viral videos, and then there's also a great blog post with 10 ways to help your videos go viral that goes into the day of
the week that you release it, and then really hustling to
try to get it posted on blogs and shared by influencers.

So there's definitely
some things you can do, and if that's something
you're going after, check out those resources
in the YouTube description. (Papers crinkle) Sarahs Back says, I
wanted to do YouTube too but I don't know what kind
of videos I should put up. What should by me first video? I'm thinking about a semi-short vlog. So, Sarah, thanks so
much for the question.

What I would say is just
post your first video. Now, a couple ideas, yeah,
a daily vlog would be great. You can also do a 20 things
or 25 things about me tag and just Google those tag questions, like facts about me, and then make a video answering all those questions, and that's starting your YouTube channel. They're getting to know you.

Or you could pick a topic
and make a video about it. Maybe make a video
about something locally, like a tour of your city, and you shoot some B-roll
and you narrate over it. Anything at all. I think the key though
is to just get started.

The cool thing about YouTube is you really definitely learn as you go. So post your first video
as soon as possible, and then keep posting more videos, and I think you'll learn
and get more clarity about what you love, what you're good at, what you don't love as much, and so, just get started creating, as soon as possible, and then tweet me the link
once you're video's live. (Sean snaps) @SeanCannell on Twitter. And …

Nate Asks, hey Sean, I want
to start making short films for YouTube, but I am
not camera-ready yet. Do you have any suggestions
for types of films that I could make that I
wouldn't actually be in? Thanks so much for the question, Nate. Here's seven quick video ideas that you can make without
actually having to be on camera and showing your face. So the first is like an
unboxing or a review video, where you just show the product.

You maybe show your hands
working and unboxing the product or reviewing the product, and you just commentate. You narrate over it. There's a lot of toy
channels that are very big that always just show the toys being unwrapped or being unboxed, and so that's an idea. The second is a drawing or doodling video.

Could be the art channels,
where they're actually drawing, or there's like whiteboard
channels, I don't know if you've seen those, kinda like
Draw My Life where they're like videos that, you
narrate and then you show what you're talking about by drawing. There's a couple book
channels that do illustrative book reviews, so those
are something to consider. The third is screen capture videos. This is where you use
Screenflow or Powerpoint and you actually can just
narrate over a presentation.

You can share information,
you can teach some stuff, and again, it's your voice,
but you're going through slide by slide, and you
can actually do this really easy on Google Hangouts. You can just record
straight from your computer on a Google Hangout on air, and just share your screen
and not show a webcam, just share your screen,
show the Powerpoint, and then it saves it there for you, and now you have a video made. Another idea would be
point-of-view videos. This would be like you have
a GoPro with a head mount or a chest mount, and you
create a video that is from your point of view but
doesn't actually show you.

Just make sure that you don't
walk in front of any mirrors. Another idea would be to
do like B-roll a voiceover. So what I mean by B-roll
is just like stock footage or footage you create. So this could be, if
you're doing a city tour, you'd be like showing the
street and then showing the restaurants and then
showing landscape shots, and then you just put like
music and B-roll over it.

Or that it specifically
is even stock footage, where footage you get off the internet from like a stock site and you put some inspirational words over it or anything. Maybe it's just music and
landscape and time lapses. It's kind of cool and it shows nature. Those are definitely some ideas.

The sixth idea would be to kinda do that but with still photos. It could be like a slideshow. You just fade from picture to picture or you use some slideshow software, and that's kind of a cool way to … You can animate the photos a little bit, and so it's still a video, and then you of course have music, and it makes it even better if you do a voiceover over
the slideshow of the pictures.

And then lastly would
be like a static image. Actually podcasters do this,
where maybe you just wanna upload a song to YouTube or a
long interview or a podcast, and they just put up like one image for the entirety of the video. So it's really just like an audio track, but it still is a video,
it becomes a YouTube video, and now your podcast episodes
or whatever the content is is searchable on YouTube as well. So there's kinda seven ideas
of really how to be posting YouTube videos without ever
having to be on camera.

Question of the day: what tips do you have for what someone's first
YouTube video should be, and post a link to your
first YouTube video in the description below. Do it. I wanna see what your
first video was ever, so post it in the description. If you have a question that
you want to be featured in one of the next THiNK
Media TV Q&A episodes, post that in the comments section as well.

So hey, thanks so much for
checking out this video. Definitely subscripe for
more videos just like this, and if you haven't
downloaded the THiNK Media TV. Video Gear Buyer's Guide, it's
the guide where I go through the best lighting, cameras, and audio gear that I recommend for every
different budget level, so you can grab that. I'll link it up on the YouTube card as well as in the description below.

Until next time, THiNK Media
TV is helping you go further faster in media. Keep crushing it, and we will talk soon. (Camera beeps) All right, all right, all right. Other people.

Do a whole video and there's spinach … (Camera beeps)
Check. All right, all right. (Sean laughs artificially) (camera beeps)
Check, all right.

All right. They could be shocking. (Sean gasps)
(camera beeps) (Geiger counter beeps steadily) And how to make things sound a lot longer than they should sound. Okay.
(Camera beeps).

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